A blog for the students of the AAJA Radio project.

Tuesday, August 22, 2006

I just finished listening to the entire produced package of our radio show - host and all. I have 2 words ... it rocks! The pieces have such a wealth of sound and voices - my mind's eye can really see all the locations our reorters went. Congtratulations reporters, editors, mentors, enigeer (REE-T), and webmaster - all your hard work paid off.

Miscellany ...
A few weeks ago, I went to an AAJA Atlanta local chapter meeting. I met a lot of cool people like Rodney Ho and Keit Do. They even roped me into their college student recruiting efforts because I live so close to Emory.

Six weeks months ago, before I arrived in Atlanta, Ko, Jennifer, and I went to an internet journalism panel at the National Press Club sponsored by AAJA. The washingtonpost.com editor was there, as was a hardcore blogger. It was a good chance to see each other again and learn about careers in new media.

I really doubt anyone is reading the blog posts at this point, but I figured I'd document for posterity.

Peace,
Dave

I just finished listening to the entire produced package of our radio show - host and all. I have 2 words ... it rocks! The pieces have such a wealth of sound and voices - my mind's eye can really see all the locations our reorters went. Congtratulations reporters, editors, mentors, enigeer (REE-T), and webmaster - all your hard work paid off.

Miscellany ...
A few weeks ago, I went to an AAJA Atlanta local chapter meeting. I met a lot of cool people like Rodney Ho and Keit Do. They even roped me into their college student recruiting efforts because I live so close to Emory.

Six weeks months ago, before I arrived in Atlanta, Ko, Jennifer, and I went to an internet journalism panel at the National Press Club sponsored by AAJA. The washingtonpost.com editor was there, as was a hardcore blogger. It was a good chance to see each other again and learn about careers in new media.

I really doubt anyone is reading the blog posts at this point, but I figured I'd document for posterity.

Peace,
Dave

Saturday, June 24, 2006

Got in last night at 2:30 after we tried Zanzibar (too much cover), then Cirque Hawaii (closed) , and L&L (also closed). We wound up at Jack-in-the-box and I got fries, and Wilma got a fish sandwhich with onion rings. I got up at 7:45, showered, packed, and checked out.

Started today with a radio salon where we listened to our production. Had some minor technical difficulties (audio got misbounced and I didn't update the Incue, so the host lede did not jive withthe interview). But the interview went okay. The other pieces sounded great. I got great response from my "hairpiece." Lotta great people showed up - Nguyen Qui Duc, Ruth Castillo-Eggett, Michelle C. Smith, Toan Lam, and Scott Tong. Thanks for all your support. Duc is moving to Hanoi in August - best of luck, Duc, we'll miss you.

Ya'll, I had a great week - props to all my student, mentor, and AAJA posse.

Gotta run - we have to take a group picture and run off to the airport. Thanks, Craig for agreeing to drive us.


Mahalo,
David

Aloha everyone...!

*Sniffles* see you next year in Miami~

Friday, June 23, 2006

I started the day by interviewing Dr. Sanjay Gupta, senior medical correspondent for CNN. It worked out pretty well. Most questions centered around his experiences as a physician-journalist and his views on health care news coverage. I pitched a story to him - the CDC at 60 years old. He seems like a real nice guy. The interview went pretty well. At the end, I asked if I could visit the medical unit at CNN when I'm in Atlanta for my CDC rotation in August and September. His publicist gave me a business card to make arrangements.

I started out with 10 minutes of good material. We whittled that down to 2:50 when edited really tightly. I finished the edits about 2 hours ago; and it is now ready for mixing by the radio engineer extraordinaire - Tom (REE-T).

At the awards luncheon, they presented our radio project promo. REE-T put together a kick-ass slide show. The audience got a kick out of the before and after shots of me with long & short hair. Lisa Ling gave a brief talk afterwards. It was pretty moving. She talked about some of her experiences with international news stories - particularly of violence against women.

I stopped by the exhibit hall after the luncheon. I'm looking for internship experiences at news organizations for my practicum year my residency. I'll be in Atlanta Aug/Sept, so I could do stuff at CNN. I talked to the CNN recruiter and he seemed receptive. I also stopped by Slate (recently acquired by Washington Post) and National Library of Medicine. No one was at the Baltimore Sun booth, but no one was staffing it. I hope to talke to a Sun recruiter tomorrow.

The Beat staff bonded tonight over dinner. Our Editor, Traci went out and got Korean & Vietnamese food. We hung out on the beach stuffing our faces. Anyway, Tom is about to kick us out of the work room. We will then hang out by the pool to imbibe some beverages. End of another great day in paradise.

David

Thursday, June 22, 2006

What a culture shock. People do the star trek thing here, except with the thumb and pinky which they shake around and say "shaka" whenever something happens. There's also "Da Kine" which to me, sounds like a shepherd referring to his cattle. And I crossed the street in a wide-eyed panic, after walking behind some Sveltish stick-figure wearing a bikini right in the city -- but at least it wasn't a thong.

"Why would anyone want to wear geisha shoes on their jewelry?"
"Those are flip-flops. Wow. You're really out of your element, aren't you?" my Honolulu-fluent mentor informed me the other day.

Yes, yes I am. It's WILD. Absolutely wild, and I am loving every minute of it.

I'm working late tonight so that I can hopefully climb the Upper Waimano Trail tomorrow - a 14-mile hike around Pearl City. It's a pipe dream, but my radio segment on the Diamond Head hike keeps me hoping. The 11 of us went to the AAJA Awards Ceremony this afternoon where everyone got to hear our slideshow. The response was really great, and the whole convention laughed at David's teaser. Can't wait for it to air!

-Jen Chang

This convention is so awesome- just met Betty Nguyen and Lisa Ling!
Here's what I have to share about a workshop I thoroughly enjoyed...


A Few Tips for a Radio Interview, from Qui Duc Nguyen (host of Pacific Time):

-Research/know your subject
Become the interpreter for your audience: "Get the Nod" by using everyday language

-Respect your interviewee - leave your ego outside the studio
Keep the pre-interview a little general- don't be afraid to interrupt if need be
Set boundaries before the interview

-Be aware of the environment
Listen for the details

-Get the emotion:"Radio is always in color"

-Ask your interviewee to repeat the key points
Get behind the motivation

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Last night, I met an incoming resident from my preventive medicine residency training program. Because my tour of duty as Chief Resident begins July 1, I felt I should take the initiative of greeting her in advance of her starting the program. She just so happens to be visiting her brother here in sunny Honolulu. We went to Genki Sushi on Kapahulu road. Sushi cost us only ten bucks each! You can't beat that deal with a stick!

My roommates both produce for the on-line student division. Those guys are totally hard core. One of them woke up at 4 this morning to get on a boat in order to cover a story. My other roommate got in hella late last night, like, 2 or 3 am. He snores pretty loud - but I shouldn't be the one to complain - apparently I talk and laugh in my sleep. Besides - it's nothing that a couple good earplugs from ABC stores can't fix.

Scott Tong, a reporter for Marketplace, dropped by to talk to us about good radio reporting techniques. He gave a very worthwhile presentation where he talked about careers, pitching stories, and writing. He also played 2 stories from Marketplace.

We need Asian men as role models in broadcast journalism. They put so few Asian men on TV in general - funny how over 30% of San Francisco men are of Asian descent, but most sitcoms set there have few or no Asian men in the cast. And you see way too few Asian American men in broadcast news. Sure, you'll hear the execs balk about how few Asian American men enroll in the J schools and how hard it is to find qualified applicants and blah blah blah blabbity blah. Well guess what? Unlike law or medicine, you don't need board certification, licensure, or even a degree to go into journalism. So saying that the J-schools aren't pumping out enough Asian men is a just pathetic excuse for a weak-ass argument. Plenty of qualified Asian male broadcasters are out there. Nobody said committment to diversity was easy.

Thanks for humoring me by reading my rant,
Dave

I'm working like a mad-woman to finish the rest of my script but someone (I will name no names) keeps insisting that I post a blog. If I lose time on the beach, I'll be knocking on your door.

It's tough working indoors, staring at a computer all-day, when you're in the middle of paradise. A trip to the restroom is my only reprieve. I make several trips during my work time just so I can stare at the beach and ocean. It's postcard perfect. It's so close, yet so far because until I finish this story, I can only stare at it from outside the newsroom.

Tuesday, June 20, 2006

I called up my dad to get his reactions to my father's day present. We recorded the telephone line to get sound for our radio show. When I called him at about 8pm EDT, he had not yet opened the present. I attached a note on the wrapper asking him not to open it until Fathers Day. They arrived home late Sunday and have been recoving from their Chicago visit ever since. My mom and dad apologized profusely for not opening it earlier. Dad was having a hard time cracking open the wrapping paper. I must have done a very thourough job of wrapping that gift.
My mom said, "I don't mean to waste your time. We can call you back when he finishes opening it."
"No, no, that's quite all right." I said with concern that I would miss my dad's immediate reaction. "I have no problem chatting with you in the mean time." I could tell when he opened the package from their burst of excitement and laughter. I asked him if he liked what I sent him.
"Yes, very good; it’s better. I think it look a more formal. Look like gentleman, okay?" He replied. I could tell he enjoyed the brand new picture I sent him of me with short hair. "Not a hippie there anymore."
Be sure to keep an eye on the Next Generation Web Site for my related commentary.


On Father’s Day in Hawaii, it was already Monday in Guam. My dad was appointed last week by the Governor to the Guam Visitors Bureau of Directors.

He deserves it. As the small business man type, he ran a travel agency, a karaoke bar and now, a taxi company. And though he can support me and my brother to pursue our higher education two oceans away, he still is never home because he’s starting up a new advertising business.

And that’s where I get my work ethic. My immigrant-father may not know of AAJA or NPR, but he knows that as long as I’m pushing myself at something I’m passionate about, he’ll continue to put as much cash as I ask for into my bank account – out of love, for me and for my education.

Go-mah-wuh, Dad! And oh, congratulations!

Late Entry...from 6 pm, Monday, June 19, 2006.

On the first day, today, I compiled the names, numbers and hotel rooms for all the Beat staff. I went to Blockbuster to get movies for sound clips for my commentary. Then, after 2 edits, completed my focus statements for my pieces. One deadline is set for Wednesday, and the other is on for Thursday.

Now that I got the fluff out of the way – I can address the important stuff – food.


You have to understand that I’m on at strict seafood diet. Last night we had dinner with the entire Beat staff at a diner. I went for the breaded fried calamari steak. Mmmm. For breakfast today (courtesy of AAJA), I had 7 strips of bacon, eggs, 2 pancakes, 2 croissants, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, corned beef hash, and orange/pineapple&cranberry juice. Lunch consisted of 2 pieces of chicken Florentine, 3 pieces of mahi mahi, Chinese chicken salad with sesame oil, sun dried tomato penne pasta, macaroni potato salad, chocolate cake and apple pie.

What? Some of the items on the menu weren’t seafood? Truth be known, my diet follows the George Foreman doctrine … “If I see food, I eat it.”

Documenting the Davecapades from beautiful (but somewhat overdeveloped) Honolulu , Hawaii ,

David Shih

Monday, June 19, 2006

It’s hard to work when paradise surrounds you. But what’s even harder is to not go around Hawaii and explore all that AAJA’s student radio project offers – to complete my first radio story.

Here was today’s check list:
§ Turn in focus statement to Traci, the editor
§ Research Korean dramas online
§ Conduct first interview at International Marketplace
§ Log and track session

Today I also had lunch outside the “Pink Palace” with my mentors Wilma Consul and Reena Advani. Wilma told me to take full advantage of this project and more importantly, of my internship at National Public Radio. It is essential, she says, to impress not only your supervisor but the people who give you the smaller assignments. They will be the ones who have something meaningful to say when your application is on the table as a temporary after your internship.

Temporary?!

I just officially started reporting for the radio this June… it’s amazing to dream in my lounge chair about where I’ll be working in a couple years – temporary or not. I hope that wherever I end up in the world will be like Hawaii, as the AAJA convention describes – “where diversity lives.”

I look forward to the rest of the week.

-- Ko Woon Im